Sunday, June 17, 2018

The Initial Upper Paleolithic of Kamenka site, Zabaikal region (Siberia): A closer look at the blade technology

N. Zwyns, L. V. Lbova
Archaeological Research in Asia
2018
(Link) (open access pdf)

Abstract

In Asia, the Initial Upper Paleolithic refers to blade-based lithic assemblages that display a speci
c suite of features and date back to the beginning of the MIS3. Previously we reported strong similarities between ex-amples from the Siberian Altai and North Mongolia, but little is known about what generates the variabilityobserved at the assemblage level. The site of Kamenka is particularly relevant to address these issues for severalreasons. First, it documents some of the earliest occurrences of the Upper Paleolithic in the Zabaikal region.Second, the fast burial of the archaeological layer and the bone preservation provide groundwork to discusshuman subsistence strategies. Third, the dominant raw material sources could be distant and fall outside of thedaily foraging radius. Here we give a closer look at the Kamenka A blade assemblage to model the reductionsequences. Our analyses con
rm that the blade technology
 
ts a conservative de
nition of the Initial UpperPaleolithic in Asia. Considering other lines of evidence (such as spatial distribution, or fauna analyses), wediscuss the impact of mobility, site function and raw material procurement strategies on the assemblage com-position. We conclude that while some of these parameters may a
ff 
ect the tool types and reduction stagesrepresented within the assemblage, the blade reduction method does not show substantial di
ff 
erences betweenneighboring regions
In Asia, the Initial Upper Paleolithic refers to blade-based lithic assemblages that display a speci
c suite of features and date back to the beginning of the MIS3. Previously we reported strong similarities between ex-amples from the Siberian Altai and North Mongolia, but little is known about what generates the variabilityobserved at the assemblage level. The site of Kamenka is particularly relevant to address these issues for severalreasons. First, it documents some of the earliest occurrences of the Upper Paleolithic in the Zabaikal region.Second, the fast burial of the archaeological layer and the bone preservation provide groundwork to discusshuman subsistence strategies. Third, the dominant raw material sources could be distant and fall outside of thedaily foraging radius. Here we give a closer look at the Kamenka A blade assemblage to model the reductionsequences. Our analyses con
rm that the blade technology
 
ts a conservative de
nition of the Initial UpperPaleolithic in Asia. Considering other lines of evidence (such as spatial distribution, or fauna analyses), wediscuss the impact of mobility, site function and raw material procurement strategies on the assemblage com-position. We conclude that while some of these parameters may a
ff 
ect the tool types and reduction stagesrepresented within the assemblage, the blade reduction method does not show substantial di
ff 
erences betweenneighboring regions.
In Asia, the Initial Upper Paleolithic refers to blade-based lithic assemblages that display a speci
c suite of features and date back to the beginning of the MIS3. Previously we reported strong similarities between ex-amples from the Siberian Altai and North Mongolia, but little is known about what generates the variabilityobserved at the assemblage level. The site of Kamenka is particularly relevant to address these issues for severalreasons. First, it documents some of the earliest occurrences of the Upper Paleolithic in the Zabaikal region.Second, the fast burial of the archaeological layer and the bone preservation provide groundwork to discusshuman subsistence strategies. Third, the dominant raw material sources could be distant and fall outside of thedaily foraging radius. Here we give a closer look at the Kamenka A blade assemblage to model the reductionsequences. Our analyses con
rm that the blade technology
 
ts a conservative de
nition of the Initial UpperPaleolithic in Asia. Considering other lines of evidence (such as spatial distribution, or fauna analyses), wediscuss the impact of mobility, site function and raw material procurement strategies on the assemblage com-position. We conclude that while some of these parameters may a
ff 
ect the tool types and reduction stagesrepresented within the assemblage, the blade reduction method does not show substantial di
ff 
erences betweenneighboring regions.
In Asia, the Initial Upper Paleolithic refers to blade-based lithic assemblages that display a speci
c suite of features and date back to the beginning of the MIS3. Previously we reported strong similarities between ex-amples from the Siberian Altai and North Mongolia, but little is known about what generates the variabilityobserved at the assemblage level. The site of Kamenka is particularly relevant to address these issues for severalreasons. First, it documents some of the earliest occurrences of the Upper Paleolithic in the Zabaikal region.Second, the fast burial of the archaeological layer and the bone preservation provide groundwork to discusshuman subsistence strategies. Third, the dominant raw material sources could be distant and fall outside of thedaily foraging radius. Here we give a closer look at the Kamenka A blade assemblage to model the reductionsequences. Our analyses con
rm that the blade technology
 
ts a conservative de
nition of the Initial UpperPaleolithic in Asia. Considering other lines of evidence (such as spatial distribution, or fauna analyses), wediscuss the impact of mobility, site function and raw material procurement strategies on the assemblage com-position. We conclude that while some of these parameters may a
ff 
ect the tool types and reduction stagesrepresented within the assemblage, the blade reduction method does not show substantial di
ff 
erences betweenneighboring regions.
In Asia, the Initial Upper Paleolithic refers to blade-based lithic assemblages that display a specific suite of features and date back to the beginning of the MIS3. Previously we reported strong similarities between examples from the Siberian Altai and North Mongolia, but little is known about what generates the variability observed at the assemblage level. The site of Kamenka is particularly relevant to address these issues for several reasons. First, it documents some of the earliest occurrences of the Upper Paleolithic in the Zabaikal region. Second, the fast burial of the archaeological layer and the bone preservation provide groundwork to discuss human subsistence strategies. Third, the dominant raw material sources could be distant and fall outside of the daily foraging radius. Here we give a closer look at the Kamenka A blade assemblage to model the reduction sequences. Our analyses confirm that the blade technology fits a conservative definition of the Initial Upper Paleolithic in Asia. Considering other lines of evidence (such as spatial distribution, or fauna analyses), we discuss the impact of mobility, site function and raw material procurement strategies on the assemblage composition. We conclude that while some of these parameters may affect the tool types and reduction stages represented within the assemblage, the blade reduction method does not show substantial differences between neighboring regions.

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