Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Paleolithic Cave Painters Were Often Women


Hand prints from the El Castillo caves

Nidhi Subbaraman, NBC News, Full Article (Link)

"Alongside drawings of bison and horses, the first painters left clues to their identity on the stone walls of caves, blowing red-brown paint through rough tubes and stenciling outlines of their palms. New analysis of ancient handprints in France and Spain suggests that most of those early artists were women."

"This is a surprise, since most archaeologists have assumed it was men who had been making the cave art. One interpretation is that early humans painted animals to influence the presence and fate of real animals that they'd find on their hunt, and it's widely accepted that it was the men who found and killed dinner."

"But a new study indicates that the majority of handprints found near cave art were made by women, based on their overall size and relative lengths of their fingers."

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